Whose Likeness Is Depicted On The Purple Heart

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Whose Likeness Is Depicted On The Purple Heart

Whose likeness is depicted on the Purple Heart is the most common question. The Purple Heart was the first military decoration in the United States, and it initially began by General George Washington in 1782. According to the records, just three men—all noncommissioned officers—received it during the American Revolution. There are still two of these coveted badges. The original medal was just a piece of purple fabric having a heart shape with a silver braid. The award again started to commemorate Washington’s 200th birthday (February 22, 1932). Let’s know more about whose likeness is depicted on the Purple Heart!

Introduction

The original Purple Heart, also famous as the “Badge of Military Merit,” was public on this day in 1782 by General George Washington. A medal in the shape of a heart with a gold border and a portrait of General George Washington on it is the Purple Heart award. Members of the American armed services who suffered an injury while engaged in combat with an enemy achieved the Order of the Purple Heart, the oldest military medal in the country for military distinction. Additionally, it is for the soldiers who endured poor treatment while serving as prisoners of war.

George Washington

Let’s find the answer about whose likeness is depicted on the Purple Heart! The original Purple Heart, also famous as the “Badge of Military Merit,” was public on this day in 1782 by General George Washington. A medal in the shape of a heart with a gold border and a portrait of General George Washington on it is the Purple Heart award. Members of the American armed services who suffered an injury while engaged in combat with an enemy get the Order of the Purple Heart, the oldest military medal in the country for military distinction. Additionally, it is for the soldiers who endured poor treatment while serving as prisoners of war.

Some Things Related to The Purple Heart

The Purple Heart is an old army decoration still for American forces members.

The Continental Congress established the Fidelity Medallion in 1780; however, only three soldiers received it that year. It was the first predecessor of the Purple Heart. President George Washington established the Badge of Military Merit two years later, in 1782. Instead, the Badge of Military Merit is famous as the first U.S. military decoration and the Purple Heart’s predecessor. The Fidelity Medallion is typically a famous commemorative because no one got it again.

Later, the Badge of Military Merit evolved into the Purple Heart, which is still for deserving U.S. service members today.

One of the first military medals awarded to all ranks was the Purple Heart.

Before 1782, when the Badge of Military Merit, the forerunner to the Purple Heart, was initially established, most military medals were only granted to officers who had won decisive battles. Purple Heart is the first award for lower-ranking enlisted or non-commissioned officers for their distinguished service. It was truly a military medal by the people, for the people.

Eligibility for the Purple Heart Medal today

Army General Douglas MacArthur is famous for giving the Purple Heart its current name and appearance in 1932.

MacArthur created the medal in collaboration with the Washington Commission of Fine Arts and Elizabeth Will, a heraldry expert in the Army’s Office of the Quartermaster General, to update and rename the award in time for George Washington’s bicentennial.

The restored Purple Heart medal, which bears a portrait of George Washington, was public solely as a combat award for the Army or Army Air Corps, honoring valorous deeds and those injured or killed in action.

Who Was the First American to Receive a Purple Heart?

Soldiers William Brown and Elijah Churchill were the first to get the Badge of Military Merit. While Churchill got popular for his bravery during combat near Fort St. George on Long Island, New York, Brown probably got the honor for his assistance during the Yorktown Siege.

Army General Douglas MacArthur was the first serviceman to achieve the modern-day Purple Heart for his work in World War II Pacific theatre, notably in the Philippines.

The First Female Purple Heart Medal Recipient

Army Lt. Annie G. Fox was the first female recipient of the Purple Heart in 1942 for her valiant efforts during the 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. While Pearl Harbor and her hospital had an attack, Fox, the chief nurse at Hickam Field, Hawaii, maintained her composure and successfully instructed the hospital personnel to tend to the injured as they entered the harbor.

Cordelia “Betty” Cook wasn’t the first woman to have the Purple Heart, but she was the first also to achieve the Bronze Star. Cook had wounds by shrapnel in 1943 during work at a hospital on the Italian front. Cook kept working despite her wounds and later became famous for her bravery with both awards. It must be clear to you now whose likeness is depicted on the Purple Heart!

Only President with a Purple Heart is John F. Kennedy

Only John F. Kennedy held the office of president of the United States. He had a back injury when a Japanese ship rammed his patrol torpedo boat close to the Solomon Islands. Kennedy resisted allowing his disability to keep him from pulling a crew member who had sustained severe burns to safety as his boat sank.

Kennedy swam over three kilometers to reach an island. He delivered the man safely to shore with the victim’s life jacket strap between his teeth.

How many Purple Hearts are there in total? The person with the most Purple Hearts!

Throughout their military careers, service members are eligible to acquire numerous Purple Hearts. For a single military man to receive the most Purple Hearts, Curry T. Haynes presently holds the record.

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After getting a bullet in the arm during an ambush in the jungle while serving in Army during the Vietnam War, Haynes received his first Purple Heart. He had surgery in Japan. Then, he returned to the front, where his deeds led to the awarding of nine more Purple Hearts. Haynes suffered several wounds during one assault, including amputating two fingers and evading numerous explosives. Later, he got nine Purple Hearts, one for each wound, and died of cancer in July 2017. It was all about whose likeness is depicted on the Purple Heart!

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